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and southern california and arizona and north carolina are informed in the post-world war two period by this historic shift in population and political influence and it is pogo from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of as the period of the sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson, nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected so he doesn't count. jimmy carter, ronald reagan from california, the first george bush from texas, bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas since 2008 is a watershed election. there were critical of the politics that the flood that came out of the sun belt. they tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense of an opposition to the union and the defense of the free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and the southwest that we see the rise by the 1970's to talk about is the religious right's involved in the political process in the new and important ways. so he was at the forefron
to be in-- incorporated to the union. i think the hope was akin to what california had done, establish a sovereign state and have the u.s. government take it as a done deed and skip territorial status. there's actually there was some confusion. they sent one petition asking to be admitted and got worried and sent a second petition asking for admittance of a state. congress is wary of admitting it for a number of reasons including a small population. ultimately it ends up as a utah territory. >> next question. over here with the mic, please. thank you. >> i'm wondered, you know, i have just finished reading the book this morning. it's brilliant. i wonder if you could tell us a little bit more about the uniterred order, there's some comments about young's attitude with respect to capitalism. could you expand on that further? >> sure. well, he's a little hard to pin down on capitalism mainly because his form of concern is not allowing outside capital to have too much power over developments in utah. he's very -- very much in favorite of promoting that official economic relationships with
incredibly well here. in california, that is not an issue. it is not a tradition there. but if they can look and say, okay, in order to be a valuable local democratic process, something needs to be inclusive and deliberative and it needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework for people to say, all right, we don't have to have town meetings and all apples. we can have oranges. the people can take that inspiration and use it from wherever they are so that the democratic possibilities why is it locally. in some ways, that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> vermont became a state in 1791 and since that time, it has become the largest producer of maple syrup in the united states and one of the blur discredit producers in the country. it is also rich in history and literary culture. over the course of her recent visit with the help of our cable partner, comcast, booktv brings you many interviews with local authors. you can watch a few of those now. >> here we go. i am paul carnahan. this is margarete strawn. we are in the vermont history center. we have a photo albu
of california and the ninth circuit, and then write out of boston there's the gay and lesbian advocates and defenders and they are bringing what is the most effective case against the so-called defensive marriage act, doma and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or any of those cases and then have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so, is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality and it felt appropriate to write about this and i will tell you a little bit about why intended it for. the book is laid out in the conversation between me and someone who would describe themselves as reasonably tolerant of gay and lesbian people also tolerance isn't all it's cracked up to be. i have a friend who says that the only thing one should have to tolerate is hemorrhoids. [laughter] perhaps a little overstated. but if you for ever been on the receiving end of tolerance it doesn't feel all that much better than intolerance. if someone is begrudgingly at mending your right to exist it just doesn't feel all that warm and fuzzy. so, i imagine a conversations and
to missouri and texas to california. she helped out banks when times were bad and they were in trouble. she was the largest individual lender to the new york city government. she lived in the gilded age when society lived lavishly and she rebelled against their opulence. she lived a simple life. she loved her children and her friends. she was of those who befriended her for her money and she showed her dog great affection and when asked why, she said -- [inaudible] [laughter] she forged a path for women to be able to have careers. she showed that women were the equal of any man. newspapers around the world, they proclaimed her the queen of wall street. it was known throughout that she was the richest woman in america. so there are lots of sayings in the back of the book and words of wisdom. she did have a good sense of humor and she was one smart lady. if you have any questions, i would love to try and answer. >> would you find any evidence of her support? >> nine. she said women should not have the right to vote. margaret thatcher did leave and not either. vera can't even believe in it. it
town meetings and apples. we can of oranges in some other process in california to people can take the inspiration and use it from wherever they are to the democratic possibility rises up locally and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> here we go. >> and 73 from the historical society. if a sub for a librarian and were in the vault of history center in vermont. we've got a photo album created by george houghton, a vermonter who went down to view and take pictures of burbach troops are in civil war. he presented this album to us in 1863 after he returned from his third trip to virginia, taking pictures mostly of vermonters that camp, but also other scenes that he saw. one of the scenes that often reproduced as this one of a family of slaves again tieless. right below it is a photograph of soffa vermont officers. >> some of the other pictures showed been batteries they were using that were involved in this. there are photos here show in the aftermath at the burial ground of the soldiers. those photos get used a lot. there's a batter
the university of california santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of things. as a rock drummer he was part of several groups one of which opened for steppenwolf among other performers for those old enough to remember that. his first film, rocking the wall about rock music had spared in bringing down communism started airing on pbs this weekend will continue throughout this year. he serves on the faculty at the university of dayton where he has talked business, economic history and military history, he is the author of a dozen books including first, a patriot's history of the united states which he co-authored. other topics on which he is written include national defence, history, the u.s. economy. a television series based on winklevoss is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome juan williams to hear about his newest book, winklevoss which in this case will be from 1898 -- winklevoss -- a patriot's history of the modern world. >> thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it is an
his doctorate from the university of california santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a vary of -- variety of rock bands. he was part of several groups, one of which opened for steppen wolf among other performers for those old enough to remember them. his first film, "rocking the wall," began airing on pbs this week and will continue throughout this year. dr. schweikart serves on the faculty at the university of dayton where he has taught business, economic history as well as military history. he is the author of more than a dozen books including, first, "a patriot's history of the united states," which he co-authored. other topics on which he has written include national defense, history and histography and the u.s. economy. a television series based upon "patriot's history of the united states" is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome dr. schweikart to hear about his newest book, "a patriot's v. of the modern world -- version of the modern world." please join me in welcoming larry schweikart.
like georgia and texas and florida and southern california and north carolina, i mean, just think about it. this. from 1964 to 2008, it is a period -- a president elected from those years from 1964 to 2008, they were from the sun belt states. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. it ends this forty-year period. there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed. it tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense and in opposition to unions and the defense of free enterprise policy. also it is in the sun belt, the south and southwest of the see the sunrise of the 1970s to talk about the religious right. the rise of evangelical and fundamentalist voters. national defense, he was a staunch economist who played an important role in populist politics in the late 50s and early 1960s. one of the things that led this to switch parties in 1964. he was opposing labor unions.
bookstores in america like cody's bookstore in berkeley, california, was firebombed. at a bookstore in london that was firebombed toys. bookstores all over the world that were attacked, not just burn but actually people going into bookstores and threatening people working there. and in publishing companies and then, well, the great tragedy was the books, the japanese translator, was murdered at his university in japan. and there was intent to murder and norwegian publisher and the italian translator of the book, for both fortunately survived. but this was a shooting war. and the point is that in all these cases, the evidence that emerged showed that these were professional hits. >> this was not spontaneous. >> no, no. these were professional hits. and so basically the danger was very high. until this moment in around the turn-of-the-century, when we finally managed to get the iranians to back down. and at the point at which we are convinced certain that the action had stood down these gangs of killers, really most of the danger went away. >> dr. hatchett and to this next question. what is the
for our guest here in miami is patricia in cottonwood, california. patricia, you're on booktv. go ahead with your question or comment for neil barofsky. .. >> guest: well, first of all, thank you. that really feels great. you know, writing a book like this, it's a challenge writing about the bailout, and what i really tried to do was to make it accessible and understandable, and when i had the job in washington, special inspector general, that was the montra. i called it t.a.r.p. 101, it was put out so the american taxpayers, those paying for the program could really understand what was going on. it was the goal so it feels particularly good to hear the really kind comments that you just said. as far as the next book, i'm sort of recovering from this book. i really did it as a first time author, i did enjoy the process, and i really -- it was something that was, you know, you never know when you go on add veepture or journey in producing a book what it will be like, i am interested in writing something else, but i have not seen the topic to sink teeth into, but i want to write a seg boo
stanford, california is. went to berkeley to get away from stanford. a state political theory. now was hired by a man i was working for as an assistant well was a student. the rest is history. >> of want to give him this comment. what influence to you think mr. hichens writing hand along with shaping women's history? >> i am not sure i know that he was the most egalitarian, seriously. he was absolutely -- he thought of women and men as complete equals. he wrote that piece for vanity fair. you know, it was one more assignment command eroded. if you actually read it does not -- the article does not say what the title might imply. yes. he was so nonsexist for a guy who was such a man's man in so loved by women. very charismatic. women adored him. he did not play the sexual cardinal. i don't know if he has a place in women's history perce, but just in the liberation of all groups. he would definitely have thought that the better law made sense. he would never think a woman should make less than a man. think maybe there is just -- that's it. i have nothing to say more. >> just a couple
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)